Sunday, 17 August 2014

(136) Anderton of Lostock Hall, baronets

Anderton of Lostock
This branch of the Anderton family were no doubt closely connected to the Andertons of Euxton and the stem family of Anderton (Lancs), but the precise nature of the connection has not been established with certainty.  Christopher Anderton (c.1533-92) was a successful London lawyer and Duchy of Lancaster official, and in 1562 he purchased the manor of Lostock (Lancs) and built a new semi-timbered manor house there.  At the end of his life, perhaps after retiring to his estate, he also constructed a large new gatehouse, dated 1591, which still exists.  It could have been intended as the first phase of a general rebuilding, but if so, work was abandoned after his death. Lostock passed to his eldest son, James Anderton (1557-1613), who also succeeded him in his judicial appointment with the Duchy, but retired in 1608.  Brought up in a religiously conservative household, James either always had been, or reverted to being, a practising Catholic, and wrote a number of works defending and justifying the faith, although only one of these was published in his lifetime.  The rest were printed after his death by his younger brother, Roger Anderton (d. 1640), who operated a secret Catholic press at Birchley Hall between at least 1615 and 1621.

James Anderton died without issue in 1613 and the Lostock estate passed to his brother, Christopher Anderton (1559-1619), who was an avowed Recusant. He married late in life and his children were all minors at the time of his death, although his only son, Christopher Anderton (1608-50) had been through a child-marriage to Agnes Preston, which produced one daughter. In the mid 1620s Agnes must have died, for he married again, and his second wife, Alathea Smith, produced a large family. Christopher himself seems to have been ambivalent about the Royalist cause in the Civil War; declaring for the king but refusing to fight, he found himself taken prisoner by Prince Rupert and held at Liverpool and later at Chester.  He escaped into Wales and later to France, but was soon back in Lancashire and was present at the storming and massacre of Bolton in 1644, although he later maintained that he had not borne arms for the King. Despite his protestations, his estates were sequestered for the twin crimes of Recusancy and delinquency, and had not been recovered at the time of his death in 1650. In the 1650s his widow seems to have endured several years of real poverty, during which several of the children were put into service and apparently mistreated.  Two, perhaps three, of the sons, and two of the daughters entered the church, but the eldest son and heir, Sir Francis Anderton (1628-78), 1st bt. made an advantageous marriage into the Somerset family.  In the 1660s and 1670s he was able to increase the family estates significantly, buying the ancestral acres at Anderton from his distant cousins and setting up a marriage for his eldest son to the heiress of the Irelands of Lydiate Hall.  It was perhaps his connection to the Somersets which ultimately led to Francis being granted a baronetcy in 1677, the reasons for which are otherwise obscure.

Sir Charles Anderton (1657-91), 2nd bt. inherited the Lostock estate in 1678 and his wife inherited Lydiate Hall in 1682/3.
Lydiate Hall: a drawing for the Victoria County History, 1911
When Sir Charles died, the title passed in turn to four of his sons.  Sir Charles and Sir James died young, while studying at St. Omer, in 1705 and 1710. The next brother, Sir Lawrence Anderton (c.1680-1724)  became a Benedictine monk, and so the estate passed to the youngest brother, Francis Anderton (1681-1760), who also used the baronetcy title at this time although he did not inherit it until 1724.  He was part of the Jacobite uprising in 1715 and was present at the Battle of Preston in that year. For his part in the rebellion, he was convicted of high treason and sentenced to death, and although later pardoned his estates were sequestered for life. In 1724 his elder brother renounced his vows as a monk and converted to Anglicanism, allowing him to reclaim the estates, but five months later he died and since the title and estates passed once more to Sir Francis Anderton, the state resumed possession. Lostock Hall seems to have become a farmhouse from 1716 onwards; Sir Francis lived at Lydiate Hall, perhaps as a tenant of the Crown appointees who were put in to manage the estates. When he died without issue in 1760, the sequestration came to an end, and the estates passed to his sister's grandson, Henry Blundell of Ince Blundell (1724-1810), whose family will be the subject of a future post.



Lostock Hall, Lancashire


Lostock Hall, from an early 19th century engraving

A half-timbered house said to have been dated 1563 on the entrance doorcase, the year after Christopher Anderton acquired the manor.  The drawing in Philips's Views of Old Halls of Lancashire and Cheshire shows a half-timbered house with four overhanging timber gables in the principal front, the lower portion built in either stone or brick. Another of Philips's drawings in the same book shows three gables only, the large southern one having presumably been destroyed.  The house is said to have been modernised in 1702, which was the date formerly on a rainwater head from the house, but after the estate was sequestered by the Crown in 1716 the hall became a farmhouse, and it was partly demolished in 1816 and completely taken down in 1824.


Lostock Hall in the late 19th century.

The surviving large stone gatehouse (45 x 22½ feet, and 33 feet high) is dated 1591.  It is a three-storey stone building with a staircase tower at its north-west angle, and the main front faces east.  In the centre of the ground floor is a blocked archway, and above it in the two upper stages there are eight-light mullioned and transomed windows, all these features being flanked by pairs of widely-spaced columns: Tuscan on the ground floor, Ionic and Corinthian above. Between each stage are wide strings taking the form of cornice, frieze, and architrave, and breaking out over the columns, the cornices only being continued as strings all round the building. The whole composition shows a far more pronounced Renaissance spirit than is usually found in this part of Lancashire at this time. There were originally no windows on the ground floor, but two sashes have been introduced between the columns, one on each side. Over the large window on the first floor is a square panel with the arms of Anderton surmounted by helm, crest, and mantling, and over the second floor window is a similar panel with a shield bearing the royal arms of Queen Elizabeth, with the date 1591 and the royal initials E.R. The upper cornice is crowned with a scalloped parapet with traces of finials on the alternate crenallations. 


Lostock Hall c.2008. Image: Country Landscapes Ltd.

The other three sides of the building are faced with thin coursed rubble. The west arch of the gateway is also blocked up, but otherwise this face of the building preserves a good deal of its original appearance, having six mullioned windows, the lower ones with hood-moulds. The staircase wing at the north-west corner is built of rough thin-coursed stones and has its original windows; but the top of the tower, which formerly seems to have terminated in an octagonal turret with conical roof, has disappeared, and it is now finished with a plain lean-to roof sloping back from the level of the upper cornice. The original chimneystacks, too, have disappeared, and have been replaced by plain Victorian shafts. There is a range of buildings beyond the staircase tower on the north-west corner of the house extending westward, which was erected at about the time the main house was demolished. The building was used as a farm-house after 1816, and became derelict in the 20th century.  It was restored about 1960 and is now a private house; the interior has few features of interest apart from an original fireplace. 

Descent: sold 1562 to Christopher Anderton (c.1533-92); to son, James Anderton (1557-1613); to brother, Christopher Anderton (1559-1619); to son, Christopher Anderton (1608-50); to son, Sir Francis Anderton (1628-78), 1st bt.; to son, Sir Charles Anderton (1655-91), 2nd bt.; to Sir Charles Anderton (d. 1705), 3rd bt.; to brother, Sir James Anderton (d. 1710), 4th bt.; to brother, Francis Anderton (1680-1760), (later 6th bt.); sequestered following the Jacobite rising in 1715 but in 1724 released to Sir Laurence Anderton (d. 1724), 5th bt.; reverted to the Crown until 1760 when released to Henry Blundell (d. 1810), grandson of the sister of 6th baronet; to daughter, Catherine, wife of Thomas Stonor, who demolished the house in 1816 and 1824.


Anderton family of Lostock Hall, baronets



Anderton, Christopher (c.1533-92), of Lostock Hall. Son of Lawrence Anderton esq., and his wife Sybilla, daughter of Christopher Parker of Colne (Lancs), born about 1533. Lawyer in London. JP for Lancashire; Protonotary of the Court of Common Pleas for the Duchy of Lancaster from before 1573-1592. He appears to have supported the changes in religion, but in 1592 his widow was described as a recusant. He married Dorothy, daughter of Peter Anderton esq. of Anderton, and had issue:
(1) James Anderton (1557-1613) (q.v.);
(2) Christopher Anderton (1559-1619) (q.v.);
(3) Roger Anderton (d. 1640), of Birchley; a recusant who operated a secret Catholic press at Birchley Hall 1615-21 on which among other works were printed those of his brother, James, and his cousin, Fr. Lawrence Anderton SJ (1577-1620); he married Anne, daughter of Edward Stafford esq. of Perry Hall (Staffs) and had a large family including three or four daughters who became nuns; died in 1640;
(4) Elizabeth Anderton (fl. 1598); married Thomas Tildesley (d. 1590); reported to Lord Burghley in 1598 as 'one of the most obstinate recusants';
(5) Ann Anderton; married Roger Bradshaw (d. 1641) of Haigh (Lancs);
(6) Alice Anderton; married John Orrell (d. 1627) of Turton Tower (Lancs);
(7) Isabel Anderton; married 1st, [forename unknown] Langtree, and 2nd, 1589, Gervase Rockley of Rockley (Yorks);
(8) Dorothy Anderton; married [forename unknown] Thompson.
He purchased the manor of Lostock in 1562 and built a new hall there the following year. In 1591 he built the gatehouse.
He died at Lostock, 5 May 1592.

Anderton, James (1557-1613), of Lostock Hall. Eldest son of Christopher Anderton (c.1533-92) of Lostock Hall and his wife Dorothy, daughter of Peter Anderton esq. of Anderton (Lancs), born before 1559. JP for Lancashire; Protonotary of the Court of Common Pleas for the Duchy of Lancaster from 1592-1608, and a farmer of outlaw's goods.  He must have outwardly conformed to the established religion, but he was described in 1590 as 'backward in religion' and his wife as 'a recusant, only lately conformed'; he was reconciled to the Catholic church in later life, and left a bequest of £1,500 for the maintenance of Catholic clergy in England.  He published The Protestant's Apology for the Catholic church, 1604 (2nd edn., 1608) which was read by King James I himself. He married, 1582, Margaret, daughter of Edward Tyldesley, but died childless.
He inherited the Lostock Hall estate from his father in 1592.
He died 7 September 1613.

Anderton, Christopher (1559-1619), of Lostock Hall.  Second son of Christopher Anderton (c.1533-92) of Lostock Hall and his wife Dorothy, daughter of Peter Anderton esq. of Anderton (Lancs), born 1559. Educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1588). A recusant. He married, 1600, Anne, daughter of Edward Scarisbrick, and had issue:
(1) Christopher Anderton (1608-50) (q.v.);
(2) Dorothy Anderton; married Anthony Munson of Carleton (Lincs);
(3) Margaret Anderton; married Henry Turvile (1602-71) esq. of Aston Flamville (who married 2nd, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Ravenscroft and 3rd, Grace, daughter of Humphry Berry), but died without issue.
He inherited the Lostock Hall estate from his elder brother in 1613, but two-thirds of his estates were sequestered for his recusancy in 1615 and granted on lease to Patrick Malde and John Gibb.  It is not clear when or how they were recovered.
He died in 1619.

Anderton, Christopher (1608-50), of Lostock Hall. Only son of Christopher Anderton (1559-1619) of Lostock Hall, and his wife Anne, daughter of Edward Scarisbrick, born 10 February 1607/8.  He was a ward of the Crown, 1619-28. A recusant, he was educated at Douai Abbey, 1620-21, but left after eighteen months, being 'not inclined to study'. He paid a fine of £30 to avoid knighthood in 1632. At the outbreak of the Civil War he joined the Royalist cause, but appears to have tired of it, and was later imprisoned at Liverpool and Chester for refusing to act for the king; he then escaped to Wales and fled to France. He married 1st, as a child and before 1619, Agnes (b. c.1607), daughter of John Preston of Furness, and 2nd, Alathea, daughter of Sir Francis Smith of Wootton Wawen (Warks) and sister of Sir Charles Smith, 1st Viscount Carrington, and had issue:
(1.1) Margaret Anderton (fl. 1650); died unmarried;
(2.1) Mary Anderton (c.1626-1702); married William Jones (d. 1667) of Treowen and Llanarth Court (Monmouths.), son of Sir Philip Jones of Treowen, and had issue five children; buried at Llanarth, 9 February 1702;
(2.2) Sir Francis Anderton (1628-78), 1st bt. (q.v.);
(2.3) Christopher Anderton (1629-68); married Anne Anderton of Anderton and had issue;
(2.4) twin, Robert Anderton (d. 1700); perhaps a priest or monk; died unmarried in Rome;
(2.5) twin, James Anderton; married Elizabeth (surname unknown) and had issue a daughter;
(2.6) Fr. Thurstan Celestine Anderton (c.1635-97); ordained as a secular priest, 1646, but later joined the Benedictines; chaplain to Lord Molyneux at Sefton Hall (Lancs); died at Sefton, 12 August 1697;
(2.7) Alathea Anderton (1638-79); an Augustinian nun at Louvain, with the name in religion of Alethea Magdalen (scholar, 1653; professed 1658); died 28 March 1679;
(2.8) Stephen Anderton (c.1640-1711); married Katherine, daughter of Thomas Tempest and had issue at least one son;
(2.9) Elizabeth Anderton (1641-1736); an Augustinian nun in Paris, with the name in religion of Elizabeth (professed 1664; sub-prioress 1702-14); died in Paris, 2 April 1736;
(2.10) Bruno Anderton (1644-1723), born in Wales; a priest;
(2.11) Anne Anderton (fl. 1664); married, before 1655, John Turberville of Penclin Castle (Glamorgans.) and had issue at least three sons and one daughter;
(2.12) Dorothy Anderton (d. 1653);
(2.13) Emeria Anderton (fl. 1664);
He inherited the Lostock Hall estate from his father in 1619, but was a ward of the Crown until 1628. By 1638, two-thirds of his property had been sequestered for his recusancy. His estates were sequestered by Parliament 'for popery and delinquency' and had not been recovered at his death. His widow lived in humble circumstances at Clitheroe (Lancs) during the Commonwealth.
He died in London, 7 July, and was buried 9 July 1650.

Anderton, Sir Francis (1628-78), 1st bt., of Lostock Hall. Eldest son of Christopher Anderton (1608-50) and his second wife, Alathea, daughter of Sir Francis Smith of Wootton Wawen (Warks), born 1628. He renounced the Catholic faith in order to secure possession of his family estates, but appears to have subsequently been reconciled to the faith. Created a baronet, 8 October 1677. He married, 1654, Elizabeth (d. 1706), daughter of Sir Charles Somerset of Troy House (Monmouths.), second son of the Earl of Worcester, and had issue including:
(1) Sir Charles Anderton (1657-91), 2nd bt. (q.v.);
(2) Christopher Anderton (fl. 1691);
(3) Fr. Francis Anderton (d. 1723), a Jesuit priest;
(4) John Anderton (fl. 1691).
He succeeded his father in 1650 as head of the family and, with his mother, petitioned the Crown for the release of the family estates. He purchased the manors of Anderton (Lancs) in 1668 and Lady Hall in Anderton in 1673.
He died in Paris, 9 February 1678, and was buried in St. Edmund's, the English Benedictine church there, where he is commemorated by a monument.

Anderton, Sir Charles (1657-91), 2nd bt., of Lostock Hall. Eldest son of Sir Francis Anderton (1628-78), 1st bt., and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Charles Somerset of Troy House (Monmouths.), born 1657. He married, 1675, Margaret (d. 1720), daughter of Lawrence Ireland of Lydiate Hall (Lancs) and had issue:
(1) Sir Charles Anderton (d. 1705), 3rd bt.; died unmarried at St. Omer (France), 1705.
(2) Sir James Anderton (d. 1710), 4th bt.; died unmarried at St. Omer (France), 5 October 1710;
(3) Sir Lawrence Anderton (c.1680-1724), 5th bt.; educated at St. Omer (France); an English Benedictine monk at Dieulwart near Verdun and at Lanspey (Germany); renounced his faith to secure possession of the sequestered Lostock estate from the Crown, 21 May 1724; died unmarried in London, 4 October 1724;
(4) Sir Francis Anderton (1681-1760), 6th bt. (q.v.);
(5) Mary Anderton (fl. 1720); married, 1697, Henry Blundell (1663-1711) of Ince Blundell (Lancs) and had issue, including Robert Blundell (1700-73), whose son Henry Blundell (1724-1811) inherited the Lostock estate in 1760;
(6) Elizabeth Anderton;
(7) Anne Anderton.
He inherited the Lostock Hall estate from his father in 1678. His wife was heir to the Lydiate Park estate, which came into their possession in 1682/3 and passed to their children in turn.
He died 30 December 1691 and was buried at Bolton-le-Moors (Lancs), 4 January 1691/2. His will was proved at Chester, 8 March 1693. His widow died in London, 26 August 1720 and was buried at St Pancras (Middx).

Anderton, Sir Francis (1681-1760), 6th bt., of Lostock Hall. Fourth and youngest son of Sir Charles Anderton (1657-91), 2nd bt., of Lostock Hall, and his wife Margaret, daughter of Lawrence Ireland of Lydiate Hall (Lancs), born 1680.  He wrongfully assumed the baronetcy in 1710 in the place of his brother who was a Catholic priest, and was widely known by that title before inheriting it in earnest in 1724.  He took part in the Jacobite rising, was present at the Battle of Preston, 1715, and was convicted of high treason and sentenced to death, but afterwards reprieved; he forfeited his estates for life. He was later described as a 'gallant sportsman', and in 1744 caught a prize perch which many years after was kept stuffed at Lydiate Hall. He married, c.1707/8, Frances (1686-1740), daughter of Sir Henry Bedingfield, bt. of Oxburgh Hall (Norfolk) but had no issue.
He inherited the Lostock Hall estate from his brother in 1710, but it was sequestered in 1716 for his participation in the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. In 1724 it was returned to his elder brother, Sir Lawrence Anderton, 5th bt. when he abjured his faith, but on his death reverted to the Crown and remained sequestered until Sir Francis' death in 1760. At the time of his death be was living at Lydiate Hall. Following his death the estates passed to his sister's grandson, Henry Blundell (1724-1810) of Ince Blundell.
He died 12 February and was buried at Halsall (Lancs), 18 February 1760.


Sources


J.B. Burke, Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies, 1841, pp. 10-11; N.G. Philips, Views of Old Halls of Lancashire and Cheshire, 1822; H. Shaw, Details of Elizabethan architecture, 1839, pl. 7; G.E. Cokayne, Complete Baronetage, vol. 4, p. 92; VCH Lancashire, vol. 5, 1911, pp. 95-99; J.M. Robinson, A guide to the country houses of the north-west, 1991, p.217; A.F. Allison, "Who was John Brereley?", Recusant History, 16 (1982), pp. 17-40; M. Hardman, A kingdom in two parishes: Lancashire religious writers and the English monarchy, 1521-1689, 1998, especially ch.23; C. Hartwell, M. Hyde & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Lancashire - Manchester and the South-East, 2004, pp. 243-44.

Location of archives

Anderton family of Lostock, baronets: deeds and a few estate papers, 16th-19th cents are included in the Blundell of Ince Blundell papers [Lancashire Record Office DDIN]. There are also a few relevant documents among the Anderton of Euxton muniments.

Coat of arms

Sable, three shacklebolts argent.

Wednesday, 13 August 2014

(135) Anderton of Euxton Hall

The Andertons are first recorded at Euxton (pronounced Eckston) in 1489 but can trace their origins in central Lancashire much further back. Hugh Anderton (fl. 1466-1503) inherited his mother's estates in Lancashire from his elder brother in 1485 and by 1489 had taken a lease of Euxton from the Molyneux family. A new manor house is said to have been built in the early 16th century, presumably by James Anderton (d. 1551), but nothing is known about it, and no illustration of it seems to survive. James' son, Hugh Anderton (1516-66) was recorded in 1564 as being unfavourable to the changes in religion, and the family became one of the most diehard adherents of the Catholic faith in a county with a strong Recusant tradition. William Anderton (c.1564-1618) sired seven sons, of whom the eldest inherited the estate and the rest took monastic vows on the continent, one as a Franciscan friar and the rest as Benedictine monks. The heir, Hugh Anderton (1600-70), was able to purchase the freehold of Euxton in 1627, but he was a hot-headed supporter of the Royalist cause.  He was imprisoned and his estates were confiscated and sold during the Commonwealth years, although with the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660 he recovered his property. The next owner, William Anderton (1638-1704), was one of the Catholics appointed to as a Justice of the Peace by King James II in 1687; after the overthrow of the king in 1689 he was suspected of complicity in a Jacobite plot and imprisoned, although released without charge the following year. His son, Hugh Anderton (1673-1721) was less fortunate: he took up arms in the 1715 Jacobite rebellion, was convicted of treason and outlawed in 1716. His life interest in the settled estate was seized by the Crown and auctioned off, but bought on behalf of his heir by other members of the family, keeping the estate intact. 

His son, William Anderton (c.1708-44), rebuilt Euxton Hall on a suprisingly grand scale, showing that the disabilities under which Catholic families laboured did not prevent them accumulating significant wealth. He died before the second Jacobite rebellion of 1745 and his twin sons were too young to play any part in it, so the family was saved any further difficulties in the Stuart cause. Their commitment to the Old Faith was far from extinguished however, and the heir, Francis Anderton (1739-79) became a Benedictine monk at Douai Abbey and later chaplain at Linley Hall in Shropshire. In 1763 he made the Euxton estate over to his brother William Anderton (1739-1811), and a few years later William made a valuable marriage with another local Catholic family, the Inces of Ince Hall at Ince-in-Makerfield. His bride, Frances Sobieski Ince (d. 1816), was heir to the Ince estate and the couple seem to have lived there in preference to Euxton, even though Euxton was apparently the newer and grander house.  His son, William Ince Anderton (1770-1848), lived long enough to see the Catholic faith tolerated once more, and was able to resume the roles of JP and military officer from which his family's faith had debarred his ancestors. He sold Ince Hall in about 1818 and returned to live at Euxton, rebuilding the new Catholic chapel adjoining the house with the aid of a public subscription.

William Michael Ince Anderton (1825-84) was an archetypal Victorian improving squire. In 1848-50 he remodelled or even rebuilt the house at Euxton and in the 1860s he built both a Catholic church in the village and a new Gothic chapel in the grounds of the Hall for his family's own use. He married Lady Emma Frances Plunkett, daughter of the 9th Earl of Fingall, who was a talented amateur artist, and her social status helped to ensure her daughters married well: one into the Curzons and the other into the Starkies of Huntroyde. With the couple's sons, however, the male line of the family petered out: the heir, Col. William Anderton (1855-1926) married but had no issue; and the second and third sons, Sir Francis Anderton (1859-1950) and Henry Anderton (1880-1936) never married.  Sir Francis sold the Euxton estate in 1927, ending a connection of nearly 450 years, and shortly afterwards the house was largely destroyed by fire.  The new owner, Peter Reid (d. 1949), had it reconstructed as a much smaller single-storey house, and this survives, although it became a hospital in 1984.

A younger son of Hugh Anderton (1516-66), James Anderton (b. 1542), was married at the age of 12 to Elizabeth Elston, who was probably only eleven. In 1561 she secured an annulment of the marriage on the grounds of their ages at the time and of coercion by their parents, in what must have been an interesting test-case at a time when child-marriage was not uncommon, though increasingly frowned upon. James subsequently married the heiress of Bardsea Hall at Ulverston, and this estate passed, together with his father's property at Clayton-le-Woods, to his son, James Anderton (1576-1658). This James, like his cousin of Euxton, was a strong supporter of the Royalist cause, and sacrificed three sons who were killed in engagements during the 1640s. His surviving children all died without issue, and Clayton was sold to the 3rd Viscount Molyneux in 1683 and Bardsea to the 4th Viscount in 1705.  Since almost nothing is known of the Bardsea Hall of this time, an account of this house is reserved for a future post on the Gale family, who rebuilt it in the 18th and 19th centuries.


Euxton Hall, Lancashire

Euxton Hall as rebuilt in 1739, from an engraving published in 1846.





Nothing is known of the Tudor house of the Andertons at Euxton, said to have been erected in the reign of Henry VIII, which was demolished and rebuilt by William Anderton (d. 1744), reputedly in 1739.  The new house had a thirteen bay front and two storeys, with a central pediment and a four-column portico. The house contained plasterwork by Francesco Consiglio, who also worked at Lyme Park (Ches.); this included the ceilings of the entrance hall and staircase hall, and perhaps the bust of James II crowned with laurel and surrounded by military trophies which stood over the fireplace in the entrance hall.


Euxton Hall from 6" map surveyed in 1844-47,
showing the Georgian house
Euxton Hall from 6" map surveyed in 1892-93,
showing the house as rebuilt in 1848-50.













This house in turn is said to have been rebuilt (but probably only remodelled), still in the Classical style, in 1848-50 for William Michael Ince Anderton, who inherited the estate in 1848.  This house was again of thirteen bays and had giant pilasters and ornate decoration. In 1927 the estate was sold out of the Anderton family and shortly afterwards there was a disastrous fire. In 1929, the Hall was reduced in size and reconstructed as a single-storey seven-by-six bay house by H.S. Fairhurst of Manchester. This now has a fine pedimented doorcase with unfluted Ionic columns, which could be a survivor from the 18th century house.  The masonry of the building is probably 18th and 19th century, but the cupola and mansard roof are wholly of 1929.  The side windows with shallow canopies supported by consoles look convincingly of 1850.  Inside, there survives a drawing room with an elaborate Victorian plasterwork ceiling, now concealed by a false ceiling. The two lodges are attractive classical buildings of 1850. The house became a private hospital in 1982.


Euxton Hall as reduced in size in 1929. 

What is now the Anglican parish church of Euxton was built as a chapel of ease of Leyland parish church for the Molyneux family and remodelled or rebuilt in 1573; it was presumably leased to the Andertons along with the Hall, and certainly remained a Catholic chapel after the Reformation.  In the 18th century, the Molyneuxs conformed to Protestantism and gave the building to the Established church.  For a time the family had masses said in a room in the house, but Fr. Thomas Anderton (1675-1741) created a new Catholic chapel adjoining the hall, which was rebuilt by public subscription in 1817: it can be seen in the engraving above, to the right of the house. The present chapel of 1866 was designed by E.W. Pugin (who had just built a Catholic parish church at Euxton) and is a simple three-bay single-cell building of rock-faced red sandstone with traceried windows.  It was deconsecrated in 1982 and was converted into a private house in 2004.


Euxton Hall chapel, 1866.


Descent: Hugh Anderton (fl. 1489-1503); to son, James Anderton (d. 1551); to son, Hugh Anderton (1516-66); to son, William Anderton (c.1564-1618); to son, Hugh Anderton (1600-70); to son, William Anderton (1638-1704); to son, Hugh Anderton (1673-1721); confiscated 1716 and sold 1719 to trustees for his son, William Anderton (d. 1744); to son, Fr. Francis Anderton (1739-79), who gave it 1763 to his brother, William Anderton (1739-1811); to son, William Ince Anderton (1770-1848); to son, William Michael Ince Anderton (1825-84); to son, William Arthur Alphonsus Joseph Ince Anderton (1855-1926); to brother, Sir Francis Robert Ince Anderton (1859-1950), who sold 1927 to Peter Reid (d. 1949), who reconstructed the house after a fire in 1929; sold 1950 to Sir Stanley Bell; sold 1982 and converted for use as a private hospital.


Anderton family of Euxton Hall


Anderton, Hugh (fl. 1466-1503) of Euxton Hall.  Third son of Oliver de Anderton (d. 1466) and his wife Ellen (d. 1466), daughter of Matthew de Kenyon. Recorded as a juror in 1501. He married Joan (fl. 1504/5) and had issue:
(1) James Anderton (d. 1551) (q.v.);
(2) William Anderton (fl. 1504/5);
(3) Thomas Anderton (fl. 1508);
(4) Margaret Anderton (d. 1535); married, about July 1508, Nicholas Rigby (d. 1557) of Harrock (Lancs).
He inherited his mother's estates at Culcheth, Kenyon and Haslingden etc. in Lancashire from his elder brother in 1485. He purchased a lease of Euxton and settled there by 1489.
He died after 1503.

Anderton, James (d. 1551) of Euxton Hall.  Eldest son of Hugh Anderton (fl. 1466-1503) and his wife Joan.  Recorded as a juror in 1515-16. He married, c.1510-16, Agnes, widow of Thomas Farington (d. 1508) of Little Farington (Lancs) and daughter of Henry Banastre of Bank Hall, Bretherton, and had issue:
(1) Hugh Anderton (1516-66) (q.v.);
(2) Isabel Anderton (d. 1573), married, about December 1520, Piers Worthington (d. 1577) of Blainscough in Coppull (Lancs) and had issue including Thomas Worthington DD (1549-1627), editor of the Douai Bible; buried at Standish church, 12 October 1573;
(3) Alice Anderton (fl. 1522-85); married, about January 1522/3, William Chorley (d. 1585/6) of Chorley (Lancs); living in December 1585;
(4) Mary Anderton (d. 1604), married 1st, 21 February c.1540, Thomas Asshaw (d. 1578) of Hall o' th' Hill in Heath Charnock (Lancs) and 2nd, June or July 1580, Robert Langton MP (d. 1594) of Low in Hindley; buried at Standish, 1603/4 and in her will left £300 found a free school at Standish.
He inherited the leasehold Euxton estate from his father, and apparently rebuilt the hall in the early 16th century. He also acquired a considerable estate in Bretherton and in 1523 endowed chantries in Leyland and Eccleston and at Euxton to pray for the souls of himself and his wife.
He died 29 December 1551.  His widow died before 1565.

Anderton Hugh (1516-66) of Euxton Hall.  Only son of James Anderton (d. 1551) and his wife Agnes, daughter of Henry Banastre of Bank Hall, Bretherton (Lancs), born before 16 April 1516. Took part in Henry VIII's campaign against the Scots in 1544 and was one of the Leylandshire magistrates noted as unfavourable to the changes in religion, 1564.  He married 1st, c.1538, Grace (c.1513-55), daughter of John Butler of Middle Rawcliffe Hall (Lancs) and 2nd, about August 1556, Alice, daughter of Alexander Standish of Standish (Lancs), and had issue:
(1.1) James Anderton (1542-1612) [see below, Anderton family of Clayton and Bardsea];
(1.2) Dorothy  Anderton (fl 1555), married c.1555, Adam, son and heir of Henry Banastre of Bank Hall, Bretherton but had no issue;
(1.3) Anne Anderton;
(2.1) William Anderton (c.1564-1618) (q.v.);
(2.2) Dorothy Anderton (d. 1637); JP and Clerk of the Crown at Lancaster; married 26 July 1581, Edward Rigby (d. 1627) of Burgh Hall, Duxbury (Lancs); buried 24 February 1636/7;
(2.3) Jane Anderton (d. 1621); died unmarried and was buried 1621;
(2.4) Alice Anderton (d. 1624); married c.1575, Cuthbert Clifton (d. 1579/80 of Westby (Lancs); died 1624;
(2.5) Anne Anderton (d. c.1629); married, about May 1576, William Hesketh (d. 1623) of Little Poulton Hall and Mains Hall in Little Singleton (Lancs); living 15 January 1623/4 but a grant of administration of her goods was granted, 20 April 1629.
He inherited the leasehold Euxton Hall estate from his father in 1551 and purchased a moiety of the manor of Clayton-le-Woods (Lancs) in 1557.
He died 18 January 1566.  His first wife died 10 February 1554/5.  His widow was living in 1594/5.

Anderton, William (c.1564-1618) of Euxton Hall.  Only son of Hugh Anderton (1516-66) of Euxton Hall and his second wife Alice, daughter of Alexander Standish of Standish (Lancs), baptised 16 January 1564/5. Educated at Barnard's Inn and Grays Inn (admitted 1587/8). He married, 1598/99, Isabel (1578/9-1652), daughter and coheir of William Hancock of Pendle Hall, Higham (Lancs) and widow of Richard Assheton (d. 1596) of Pendle Hall, and had issue:
(1) Hugh Anderton (1600-70) (q.v.);
(2) William Anderton (c.1602-72), an English Franciscan friar whose name in religion was William of St. Anthony; approved for preaching, 1634; died 24 June 1672, aged 70;
(3) James Anderton (d. 1645), a Benedictine monk at Douai (professed October 1623); died 27 August 1645;
(4) Christopher Anderton (d. 1653), a Benedictine monk at Douai (professed August 1624); died of the plague, 1 or 11 July 1653;
(5) Thomas Anderton (1612-71), baptised 26 September 1612; a Benedictine monk (ordained 1637); prior of the English Benedictines at Paris, 1640 and 1668-69 and at St Malo, 1661-62; died 9 October 1671;
(6) Robert Anderton (d. c.1680); a Benedictine monk (ordained 1639); titular prior of Ely, 1669; denounced by Titus Oates and retired to the Continent, where he died between June 1678 and 1681;
(7) Andrew Anderton (fl. 1618); a Benedictine novice at Douai who died before ordination;
(8) Dorothy Anderton (d. 1683); married, before 1633, William Rishton (1603-after 1682) of Pouthalgh in Church (Lancs) and later of Preston (Lancs); buried 5 August 1683;
(9) Eleanor Anderton (d. 1664); a nun; died about 20 September 1664;
(10) Alice Anderton (d. 1663); born before 1612; died unmarried and was buried 21 September 1663;
(11) Anne Anderton (d. 1678); lived with her married sister at Preston; died unmarried and was buried 1 December 1678.
He inherited the leasehold Euxton Hall estate from his father in 1566 and renewed the lease; farmer of the tithes of Euxton in 1590 and was at law with his step-brother over them in 1595. He acquired Pendle Hall (Lancs) in right of his wife in 1598/99.
He died 2 April 1618. His widow died 14 May 1652.

Anderton, Hugh (1600-70) of Euxton Hall. Eldest son of William Anderton (c.1564-1618) of Euxton Hall and his wife Isabel, daughter of William Hancock of Pendle Hall, Higham (Lancs), born 16 June 1600. A ward of the King in respect of his property in the West Riding of Yorkshire, 1618-21. A Major in the Royalist army; Commissary for the Hundred of Amounderness and Lonsdale, 1642; for his actions as one of the most prominent and active Lancashire Cavaliers in the Civil War, he was imprisoned and his estates were confiscated and sold by Parliament, but restored after the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660.  On the march south to the Battle of Worcester in 1651, King Charles II released him from imprisonment in Lancaster Castle and stayed the night of 14 August 1651 at Euxton Hall; he fought at the Battle of Wigan Lane, 25 August 1651 and was falsely reported among the slain; imprisoned again in Chester Castle, 1656.  He married, about December 1636, his first cousin once removed, Margaret (d. 1684), daughter of Ralph Kirkby of Kirkby Ireleth (Lancs) and had issue:
(1) William Anderton (1638-1704) (q.v.);
(2) Hugh Anderton (1643-1720) of Euxton, born May 1643; married Isabel (d. 1717) [surname unknown] but apparently died without issue; buried 3 December 1720;
(3) Margaret Anderton (1639-99), born October 1639; a nun at the royal French Benedictine abbey of Faremoutiers-en-Brie (professed 1657; sub-prioress); died 18/28 June 1699;
(4) Dorothy Anderton (b. 1641), born May 1641; married 1st, about 1663, John Bradshaw of Lleiniog (Anglesey) and probably 2nd, 1674, John Farnworth (d. 1691) of Runshaw in Euxton; living in August 1679;
(5) Jane Anderton (1648-90), born 3 August 1648; married, about August 1670, William Haydock (d. 1707) of Cottam Hall (Lancs); buried 25 November 1690.
He inherited the leasehold Euxton Hall estate and the Pendle Hall estate from his father in 1618. He purchased the freehold of Euxton Hall in 1627 from his kinsman, Sir Richard Molyneux, 2nd bt. of Sefton, later 1st Viscount Molyneux, and sold Pendle Hall to another relation, Pierce Starke, early in 1664. He sold lands at South Kirkby in Malhamdale (Yorks WR) and bought the tithes of Euxton and land in Clayton-le-Woods from his kinsman, James Anderton (d. 1676) (q.v.).
He died 28 August 1670.  His widow died in June 1684.

Anderton, William (1638-1704) of Euxton Hall. Elder son of Hugh Anderton (1600-70) and his wife Margaret, daughter of Ralph Kirkby of Kirkby Ireleth (Lancs), born 1638. One of those marked out for banishment on account of his religion, 1680, but appointed as a JP for Lancashire by King James II, 1687; arrested in connection with an alleged Jacobite plot, June 1689 and imprisoned in Manchester, but released without charge early in 1690. He married, 6 July 1670, Mary (d. 1703), daughter of William Farington of Worden and widow of David Lake of Wavertree (Lancs), and had issue:
(1) Elizabeth Anderton (d. 1672); died in infancy and was buried 6 September 1672;
(2) twin, Hugh Anderton (1673-1721) (q.v.);
(3) twin, William Anderton (1673-1718), born 20 February 1672/3; a Benedictine monk whose name in religion was Placid; prior of the English priory in Paris 1713-17; died 4 April 1718;
(4) Thomas Anderton (1675-1741), born 22 May 1675; a secular R.C. priest (ordained in Rome, 1702); chaplain at Towneley Hall (Lancs), 1705-41; R.C. archdeacon of Lancashire, 1732-41; died 13 July 1741;
(5) James Anderton (d. 1720); died 30 January 1719/20;
(6) Isabel Anderton (fl. 1722); married, c.1710, Robert Plumpton (b. 1670) of Plumpton (Yorks WR) but had no issue; living 1722;
(7) Mary Anderton (fl. 1735); died unmarried; living in 1735;
(8) Margaret Anderton (d. 1771); married Simeon Jenkinson (d. 1715/6) of Bleasdale (Lancs) but had no issue; will proved 1 June 1771.
He inherited the Euxton Hall estate from his father in 1670.
He died 21 May 1704. His wife died 26 February 1702/3.

Anderton, Hugh (1673-1721) of Euxton Hall.  Eldest son of William Anderton (1638-1704) of Euxton Hall and his wife Mary, daughter of William Farington of Worden, born 20 February 1672/3.  An active participant in the Jacobite rising in 1715, for which he was attainted for High Treason and outlawed, 24 July 1716.  He married, about 26 June 1707, Catherine (1676-1762), daughter of Francis Trappes-Bymand (d. 1701) and eldest sister and eventual co-heir of Francis Trappes-Bymand (d. 1761) of Nidd Hall (Yorks NR), and had issue:
(1) William Anderton (c.1708-44) (q.v.);
(2) Francis Anderton (c.1710-42); educated at the English College, Douai; a surgeon in Preston; buried at Leyland, 29 January 1741/2;
(3) Robert Anderton (b. c.1712); died young;
(4) Catherine Anderton (d. 1724); died unmarried and was buried, 14 April 1724;
(5) Elizabeth Anderton (d. 1742) of Ormskirk (Lancs); died unmarried and was buried, 27 December 1742;
(6) Mary Anderton (d. 1796) of Ormskirk (Lancs); died unmarried and was buried at Leyland, 18 March 1796; will proved 23 March 1796;
(7) Margaret Anderton (1717-98); married, 4 May 1752, Robert Blundell (d. 1773) of Ince Blundell Hall and had issue; died 28 January 1798.
He inherited the Euxton Hall estate from his father in 1704, but in 1716 his life interest was forfeited on his outlawry, and subsequently bought on behalf of his family at the auction sale in 1719.
He died 23 May 1721. His widow died in 1762.

Anderton, William (c.1708-44) of Euxton Hall. Eldest son of Hugh Anderton (1673-1721) of Euxton Hall and his wife Catherine, sister of Francis Trappes of Nidd Hall (Yorks NR), born c.1708.  Educated at English College, Douai; Mayor of the Jacobite mock corporation of Walton-le-Dale, 1734.  He married, about June 1738, Hon. Mary (d. 1752), daughter and co-heir of Richard Molyneux, 5th Viscount Molyneux, and widow of Thomas Clifton of Lytham (Lancs), and had issue:
(1) twin, Francis Anderton (1739-79), born 20 August 1739; became a Benedictine monk at Douai, 1757; later chaplain to Mr. Lacon of Linley Hall (Salop); died at Linley Hall, 5 July 1779;
(2) twin, William Anderton (1739-1811) (q.v.);
(3) Catherine Anderton (1741-1821); married, 1 May 1770, Sir Robert Cansfield Gerard (c.1725-84), 9th bt. of Bryn and Garswood (Lancs) and had issue; died 13 January 1821;
(4) Anne Anderton (1744-1807), born 16 April or 13 May 1744; a French Dominican nun at Calais whose name in religion was Catherine, until the French Revolution; died 30 November 1807.
His father's life interest in the Euxton Hall estate was bought in his interest in 1719 and he inherited the freehold on his father's death in 1721. He rebuilt the house in 1739. After his death the estate passed to his eldest son, who became a Benedictine monk and transferred the estate in 1762 or 1763 to his twin brother.
He was buried 17 October 1744. His widow died at Woolton (Lancs), 5/15 February 1752.

Anderton, William (1739-1811) of Euxton Hall. Second son of William Anderton (c. 1708-44) and his wife, the Hon. Mary, daughter of Richard Molyneux, 5th Viscount Molyneux, born 20 August 1739.  Educated at St. Gregory's, Douai. He married, 11 October 1769, Frances Sobieski (d. 1816), daughter of Christopher Ince of Ince New Hall, Wigan (Lancs) and had issue:
(1) William Ince Anderton (1770-1848) (q.v.);
(2) Robert Charles Anderton (1771-1842) of Clayton Villa, Clayton Green, Chorley (Lancs), born 23 November 1771; died unmarried, 14 September 1842;
(3) Thomas Christopher Anderton (1773-1834) of Liverpool, born 23 February 1773; Lieutenant of Ashton troop of Lancashire Volunteer Cavalry, 1798; died unmarried, 11 September 1834;
(4) Francis Joseph Anderton (1775-1863) of Clayton Villa, born 17 April 1775; died unmarried, 6 January 1863.
His elder twin brother made over the Euxton Hall estate to him in 1762 or 1763, and he acquired the Ince New Hall estate in right of his wife.
He died 6 August 1811. His widow died 3 July 1816.

Anderton, Col. William Ince (1770-1848) of Euxton Hall.  Eldest son of William Anderton (1739-1811) of Euxton Hall and his wife Frances Sobieski, daughter and heir of Christopher Ince of Ince New Hall, Wigan (Lancs), born 2 September 1770. JP for Lancashire; Major in 2nd Lancashire Fencible Regiment of Light Dragoons; Lt-Col. of Wigan Rifle Corps; Col. of Warrington Militia.  He married, 17 November 1823, Mary Frances (d. 1858), daughter of Christopher Crooke of London, and had issue:
(1) William Michael Ince Anderton (1825-84) (q.v.).
He inherited Euxton Hall and Ince Hall from his father in 1811, but he seems to have sold Ince Hall about 1818.
He died 8 November 1848 and was buried at St Mary's R.C. church, Euxton. His widow died 28 December 1858.


William Michael Ince
Anderton (1825-84)
Anderton, William Michael Ince (1825-84) of Euxton Hall. Only child of William Ince Anderton (1770-1848) of Euxton Hall and his wife Mary Frances, daughter of Christopher Crooke of London, born 29 September 1825.  Educated at Stonyhurst and Oscott College. Served in 17th Lancers. He married 1st, 12 September 1850, Lady Emma Frances Mary Plunkett (1826-66), daughter of Arthur James Plunkett, 9th Earl of Fingall, and 2nd, 20 November 1867, Casilda (d. 1929), daughter of Sir Henry John Joseph Hunloke, 6th bt., of Wingerworth Hall (Derbys), and had issue:
(1.1) Mary Louisa Anne Frances Josephine Martha Anderton (1852-89), born 26 July 1852; married, 19 March 1873, Col. George Augustus Curzon (d. 1912) and had issue a daughter, later 17th Baroness Zouche; died 2 November 1889; will proved 27 May 1890 (estate £92);
(1.2) William Arthur Alphonsus Joseph Ince Anderton (1855-1926) (q.v.)
(1.3) Sir Francis Robert Ince Anderton (b. 1859) (q.v.);
(1.4) Emma Adelaide Mary Sobieski Anderton (b. 1860); married, 17 January 1887, Brig-Gen. Dayrell Talbot Hammond CB CBE (1856-1942) of Corballis, Dunsany (Meath) but had no issue; living in Ireland, 1911;
(2.1) Henry Philip John Anderton (1880-1938), born 7 June 1880; educated at Beaumont, Stonyhurst and Magdalen College, Oxford; author of antiquarian papers on Lancashire subjects, including Collections relating to the family of Anderton, 1906; died unmarried in Switzerland, 7 March 1938; will proved 24 August 1938 (estate £183,366);
(2.2) Maud Margaret Dolores Anna Anderton (1873-1929), born 29 September 1873; married, 19 July 1898, Edmund Arthur Le Gendre Starkie of Huntroyde (Lancs) and had issue one son, who died in infancy; died 19 March 1929; her will was proved 8 October 1929 (estate £34,085).
He inherited Euxton Hall from his father in 1848 and rebuilt or remodelled the house in 1848-50. He also built a new R.C. church in Euxton, 1864-65 and rebuilt the Catholic chapel at Euxton Hall, 1866.
He died 24 January 1884; his will was proved 13 March 1884 (estate £16,058). His first wife died 14 October 1866. His widow died in Switzerland, 19 January 1929; her will was proved 1 November 1929 (estate £4,635).

Anderton, Col. William Arthur Alphonsus Joseph Ince (1855-1926) of Euxton Hall. Elder son of William Michael Ince Anderton (1825-84) of Euxton Hall and his first wife, Lady Emma Frances Mary Plunkett, daughter of 9th Earl of Fingall, born 22 December 1855. Educated at the Oratory School. Major in Grenadier Guards (retired 1896); Col. commanding Knockaloe Prisoner of War camp in the Isle of Man, 1915-19; JP and DL for Lancashire. He married, 1887, Ida Mary Winifred (fl. 1952), daughter of L.J. Johnstone of Barnard Castle (Yorks NR) but had no issue.
He inherited Euxton Hall from his father in 1884. At his death he was succeeded by his brother, Sir Francis Anderton.
He died 29 August 1926; his will was proved 30 April and 15 July 1927 (estate £107,131).

Anderton, Sir Francis Robert Ince (1859-1950). Second son of William Michael Ince Anderton (1825-84) of Euxton Hall and his first wife, Lady Emma Frances Mary Plunkett, daughter of 9th Earl of Fingall, born 22 February 1859. Educated at the Oratory School, Edgbaston; London University (MA 1879) and Lincolns Inn (called to bar, 1882); barrister-at-law on the Northern Circuit; JP; member of London County Council 1913-25 for Hammersmith (chairman, 1922-23; alderman, 1925-31); knighted, 1923; appointed Knight Commander of the Order of St Gregory the Great by Pope Pius XI, 1923. His portrait by George Fiddes Watt is in the Guildhall Art Gallery, London. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited Euxton Hall from his elder brother in 1926 but sold it the following year. At the time of his death he lived at Castle Mead, Windsor (Berks).
He died 4 January 1950, aged 90; his will was proved 16 May 1950 (estate £12,642).

Anderton family of Clayton and Bardsea Hall, Ulverston.

Anderton, James (b. 1542) of Clayton and Bardsea.  Eldest son of Hugh Anderton (1516-66) of Euxton Hall and his first wife, Grace, daughter of John Butler of Middle Rawcliffe Hall (Lancs), born 1542. Educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1562). He subscribed towards the defence of the realm in 1588-9 and signed the loyal address of the Lancashire gentry to King James I on his accession, 1603. He was married at Leyland, 18 June 1554 (annulled in Chester consistory court, 1561, on her petition, on the grounds of their ages and of parental compulsion), to Elizabeth (1542/3-1611), daughter and heir of Richard Elston of High Brockholes, Grimsargh (Lancs). His was first legally married about 1575 to Dorothy (d. 1627), elder daughter and co-heir of Nicholas Bardsey of Bardsea, and had issue:
(1) James Anderton (1576-1658) (q.v.);
(2) Hugh Anderton (1578-1603); educated privately at Oxford, 1591-92 and at Grays Inn, 1593-99; admitted to English College at Rome, 1600; received into Society of Jesus on his deathbed; died 9 or 19 September 1603;
(3) Thurstan Anderton (b. c.1580); educated at Barnards Inn and Grays Inn (admitted 1600/1); living at Clayton-le-Woods, 1641;
(4) William Anderton (d. 1600); born before 2 April 1582; died November 1600;
(5) Matthew Anderton (1585-1640); educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (admitted 1602; BA 1602) and All Souls College, Oxford (BCL 1609); Vicar-General and Commissary of the Archbishop of York during his visitation of the Diocese of Chester, 1633-34; Judge of Vice-Admiralty at Chester, 1635; married Eleanor (d. 1639), daughter of Edmund Gamull, mayor of Chester, and widow of Richard Swinton of Knutsford (Ches.) and Thomas Harvey, mayor of Chester, but had no issue; buried 29 April 1640;
(6) Thomas Anderton (d. 1600); born before June 1586; died about November 1600;
(7) Anne Anderton (fl. 1599); married by 1599 her kinsman, Henry Banastre (d. 1617) of Bank Hall, Bretherton (Lancs); died before 1616;
(8) Dorothy Anderton (fl. 1630-39); married, about December 1630, William Parker of Malton (Yorks NR); living 1639.
He inherited his father's property at Clayton-le-Woods (Lancs) in 1566, and nearly all the Lancashire property of the Bardsey family in right of his wife in 1586.
His date of death is unknown.

Anderton, James (1576-1658) of Clayton and Bardsea Hall.  Eldest son of James Anderton (b. 1542) and his wife Dorothy, daughter and co-heir of Nicholas Bardsey of Bardsea, born 1576.  Educated as a private scholar at Oxford University (matriculated 1590) and Grays Inn (admitted 1593).  He compounded for not accepting the honour of knighthood, 1633; but was a supporter of the Royalist cause and was taken prisoner by the Parliamentarians at the capture of Preston, 9 February 1642/3; his estates were seized and sold under the Rump Act of 1652, but subsequently restored to his son.  He married 1st, about March 1601/2, Dorothy (d. 1603), daughter of Sir Richard Assheton of Middleton (Lancs), and 2nd, 29 July 1610, Anne (d. 1660), daughter of Thomas Shuttleworth of Forcett Hall (Yorks NR) and sister of Richard Shuttleworth of Gawthorpe (Lancs), and had, among other issue who died young or unmarried:
(1.1) Capt. James Anderton (1603-76) (q.v.);
(2.1) Nicolas Anderton (1613-43), baptised 21 June 1613; Captain in the Royalist army and Governor of Greenhalgh Castle, Garstang which he long defended until he was killed in a Parliamentarian assault, 1643;
(2.2) Dorothy Anderton (1615-97) of Bardsea, baptised 25 July 1615; married, 1635, Thomas Singleton (d. 1643) of Staining (Lancs); will proved 10 July 1697;
(2.3) Thomas Anderton (1618-46), baptised 17 February 1617/18; Captain in the Royalist army; killed in action, 1646;
(2.4) Thurstan Anderton (1619-83) of Clayton and Bardsea, baptised November 1619; a R.C. secular priest (ordained 1646); buried 29 August 1683;
(2.5) Matthew Anderton (1621-42); a Captain in the Royalist army; killed in a skirmish at Sheriff Hutton (Yorks WR) in the summer of 1642;
(2.6) Anne Anderton (1622-1701); married, after 1669, John Hoghton (d. 1676) of Park Hall, Chorley (Lancs) but died without issue, and was buried 7 December 1701;
(2.7) Christopher Anderton (1626-94) of Bardsea; one of the R.C. JPs appointed by King James II, 1687; died unmarried; buried 14 December 1694;
(2.8) Mary Anderton (1629-1709); inherited Bardsea from her brother Christopher, 1694, but sold it to 4th Viscount Molyneux, 26 May 1705; died unmarried and was buried 22 February 1708/9.
He inherited the Clayton and Bardsea estates from his father.  At his death they passed to the only son of his first marriage.
He was buried at Leyland (Lancs), 31 May 1658. His first wife died in childbirth early in 1603.  His widow was buried at Leyland, 24 December 1660.

Anderton, Capt. James (1603-76) of Clayton and Bardsea Hall.  Only child of James Anderton (1576-1658) of Clayton and Bardsea and his first wife Dorothy, daughter of Sir Richard Assheton of Middleton (Lancs), born early in 1603.  He was under arms with the Earl of Derby at Garstang in 1651. He married, c.1660-64, Jane [surname unknown] (who married 2nd, [forename unknown] Polwhele and had issue two sons); but had no issue.
He inherited the Clayton and Bardsea estates from his father in 1658.  At his death without issue they were divided among his surviving half-brothers. Thurstan Anderton sold Clayton to 3rd Viscount Molyneux 16 March 1682/3; Christopher bequeathed Bardsea to his sister Mary Anderton, who sold it to 4th Viscount Molyneux, 26 May 1705.
He was buried in the cloisters at Westminster Abbey, 11 July 1676.


Sources

Burke's Landed Gentry, 1952, pp. 41-43; E. Baines, History of the County Palatine and Duchy of Lancaster, 1825, pp. 452-4; E. Twycross, The mansions of England & Wales: Lancashire, 1846; J.M. Robinson, A guide to the country houses of the north-west, 1991, pp. 158, 182, 209-10; C. Hartwell & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Lancashire - North, 2009, pp. 287-88.


Location of archives

Anderton family of Euxton Hall: deeds and papers, c.1280-1831 [Wigan Archives Service, D/D An]; estate accounts, 1869-1930 [Lancashire Archives, DDX 1063/1]


Coat of arms

Variously, "Sable, a chevron between three shacklebolts argent" or "Sable, three shacklebolts argent with a crescent for difference".  The crest bears a marked similarity to that of the Anderdons of Henlade.

Thursday, 7 August 2014

(134) Anderson of St. Germans and Bowerhouse

This branch of the Anderson family were established as clergymen and lawyers in Edinburgh and Perthshire from the 17th century, but only with David Anderson (1707-86) did they become prosperous enough to purchase country estates.  At the end of his life, he bought Inchyra (Perths.), which he bequeathed to his third son, John Anderson (1754-1814), who built a grand new house there, probably to the designs of James Gillespie Graham.  John's son, David Anderson Blair (1791-1853), was a member of the Scottish Faculty of Advocates but practised for part of his career in Ceylon. He probably let Inchyra while he was abroad, and later sold it, moving to The Firs, Holybourne (Hants) on his return to Britain.

The second son of David Anderson (1707-86), David Anderson (1750-1825), joined the East India Company's service and rose in its service under the patronage of his close friend, Warren Hastings. He returned from India in 1785 with a fortune of £50,000 which was more than sufficient to purchase the St. Germains estate in East Lothian and to remodel the house there.  St Germain's passed to his son, David Anderson (1791-1869) and grandson, Lt-Col. James Warren Hastings Anderson (1836-96), who sold it in 1874 and bought instead the more fashionably Baronial Bowerhouse near Dunbar. The childless David Murray Anderson (1867-1944), who inherited Bowerhouse, sold it in 1939.  His younger brother, Maj. Robert Warren Hastings Anderson (1875-1969) bought the modest but newly-built Northfield House, Colinsburgh (Fife) in 1911, which remains in the family.

St. Germains House, Longniddry, East Lothian

St Germains: south front, showing the early 18th century part of the house. The right-hand bow dates from c.1820.

The house stands on the site of a medieval hospital of the order of the Star of Bethlehem, which was said to be ruinous in 1496, but the earliest visible fabric dates from the early 18th century. This house was given a new seven-bay front range, no doubt after it was acquired by David Anderson in 1782. 


St Germain's: entrance front added after 1782. Image: James Denham. Licenced under this Creative Commons licence.

The north-facing entrance front has a rusticated ground floor and a central pediment, but the top-floor windows are too close to the roofline to be visually satisfactory, and the first-floor windows are slightly too large in proportion to those above and below. A further addition was made about 1820, when the full-height canted bay at the rear was added, and minor alterations were made by Dick, Peddie & McKay in 1910. In the 1950s, the house was divided into apartments, one of which now offers bed and breakfast accommodation.  West of the house there is a two storey stable block with a steep pediment, and in the grounds stands a cylindrical and battlemented dovecote.

Descent: sold 1780/82 to David Anderson (1750-1828); to son, David Anderson (1791-1869); to son, Lt-Col. James Warren Hastings Anderson (1836-96), who sold 1874 to Trustees of Charles Stewart Parker Tennent, who sold 1947 to J.E. Rennie; sold to J.N. Toothill, who divided the house into flats. In 1902 the house was let to a Mr. Brooks, who killed his wife and himself in the house.


Bowerhouse, Dunbar, East Lothian


Bowerhouse, Dunbar: the entrance front. Image: © Michael Oglethorpe.

A modest-sized two-storey Jacobethan mansion built by David Bryce (when he was still in William Burn's office) in 1835 for Maj-Gen. J. Carfrae of the East India Company. The house (sometimes called Bourhouse or Bower House) is built of fine pale Cullalo sandstone ashlar from Fife, which is intricately carved with great precision. The facades sport bay windows and straight and shaped gables as the main elements of a carefully and successfully balanced composition.  


Bowerhouse, Dunbar: the garden front with its two bay windows. Image: © Michael Oglethorpe.

The entrance porch forms the angle between the entrance and garden fronts.  The garden front, facing the view over a terrace, has two unequal canted single-storey bays with strapwork parapets. Adjoining the porch on the entrance front is a five-sided bay crowned with scrolled gables and a pointed roof.  The office wing beyond it is stepped forward and has a massive chimneystack.  All the windows have corner lugs with nailhead centres, and retain their original glazing of small panes.  The bold cornice incorporates concealed gutters, with internal rain conductors.

The five-windowed bay lights a long hall that penetrates the house, and which is flanked by the library and drawing room.  At the end is the dining room.  All the rooms have geometrically ribbed ceilings which shallow plain coves rather than an enriched cornice, and marble chimneypieces in a loosely French 18th century style, executed in black or liver-coloured stone. The main staircase, in a self-contained well, has an iron balustrade, and so does the adjoining service stair: the latter plainer but prettier.

There must have been an earlier house on the site, for the gardens contain an 18th century dovecote, walled garden and some contemporary urns. The stables, adjoining the office wing, and the lodge with carved bargeboards, are also by Bryce.

Descent: sold 1874 to James Warren Hastings Anderson (1836-96); to son, David Murray Anderson (1867-1944), who sold 1939...


Northfield House, Colinsburgh, Fife


Northfield House, Colinsburgh. 

The house was built as a doctor's surgery for Leonard Horner Bryson in 1905 and was acquired by the Andersons in 1911.  It remains in the family and has recently been restored; part of the building is now used as holiday accommodation.

Descent: sold 1911 to Maj. Robert Warren Hastings Anderson (1875-1969); to son, Donald Marshall Anderson (b. 1911); to daughter, Margaret Elizabeth (b. 1941), wife of James Vernon Aynscough.


Inchyra House, Perthshire


Inchyra House in 1994. Image: Nicholas Kingsley. Licenced under this Creative Commons licence.

An elegant and charming two-storey villa built about 1810 for John Anderson, an Edinburgh lawyer, probably to the designs of James Gillespie Graham. The entrance front consists of two storeys above a half-sunk basement and five widely-spaced bays, and is articulated with coupled giant pilasters at the ends and three-quarter round Roman Doric columns framing the centre.  The tripartite doorway has sidelights and a segmental-arched fanlight, and is echoed by a tripartite window above. The facade is given subtlety by the way the bases of the columns and pilasters are continued across the front as a band course below the ground floor windows, while the platband separating the first and second floors is woven through the giant columns and pilasters, increasingly the effect of depth and movement in the facade.


Inchyra House in 1994: the drawing room.

Inside, the richly decorated interiors are partly original and partly of 1956, when Gervase Beckett made alterations for Lord Inchyra. The large entrance hall has an original ceiling and chimneypiece, but the doorcases are of 1956.  The dining room has an original ceiling but the plaster wall panels are by Beckett, and the exceptional pine and gesso chimneypiece is late 18th century but was brought in during the 1950s.  


Inchyra House: detail of the dining room chimneypiece.
The central panel depicts Hope resting on an anchor while she contemplates a snarling crocodile.  Behind the entrance hall is the staircase hall, entirely of c.1810, with a simple flying stair, off which open short corridors leading to a D-shaped morning room, redecorated in 1956 but with another imported 18th century chimneypiece, and the library, formed from two smaller rooms in 1956, and with its east end marked off by a screen of Roman Doric columns.

Behind the house is a stable court, probably of c.1810, one corner of which was raised to a second storey in the 19th century to form a service house.  North of this is a steading built in 1877 for James Watson, and a farmhouse, probably of the same date.  West of the house is the early 19th century walled garden, and there is also a single-storey lodge to the south-west.

Descent: Isabel Blair, wife of Rev. Thomas Beatt sold 1785 to David Anderson (1707-86); to son, John Anderson (1754-1814); to son, David Anderson (later Blair) (d. 1853), who sold ?c.1836... David Watson (d. 1867) of Manchester; to son, Maj. James Watson (d. 1883 or 1892); to son, John Guthrie Watson (d. 1913)... sold 1955 to Frederick Robert Hoyer Millar (1900-89), 1st Baron Inchyra; to grandson, (Christian) James Charles Hoyer Millar (b. 1962), later 3rd Baron Inchyra.



The Anderson family of St. Germans, Bowerhouse and Northfield House, and of Inchyra House



Anderson, David (1707-86).  Only son of Andrew Anderson (1682-1733) of Edinburgh, writer to the signet, and his wife Margaret, daughter of Dr. Blair of Perth, born 1707. Apprenticed to William Veitch WS; writer to the signet, 1731; factor to the Earl of Wemyss.  He married, 5 November 1745, Mary (d. 1781), daughter of John Mitchelson of Middleton (Midlothian) and had issue:
(1) Francis Anderson (1748-1823) of Edinburgh, born 20 June 1748; apprenticed to his father; writer to the signet, 1773; succeeded his father as factor to the Earl of Wemyss; Deputy Auditor of Exchequer; married 1st, Miss Martin and had issue and 2nd, Jane Easton; died 27 April 1823;
(2) David Anderson (1750-1825) (q.v.);
(3) Mary Anderson (1752-1828), born 16 November 1752; died unmarried, 1828;
(4) John Anderson (1754-1814) (q.v.);
(5) Samuel Anderson (1756-1821) of Moredun (Midl.), born 1 October 1756; banker in Edinburgh; married, 1791, Jane, daughter of Sir James Hay of Haystoun, 4th bt.; died 27 March 1821;
(6) James Anderson (1757-1833), of Wilton Lodge, Hawick, born 28 October 1757; went to India in 1772 and saw much service in the Indian Army, being aide-de-camp to Warren Hastings; he joined his brother, David, at Scindia's Court, and succeeded him as Resident in 1785; resigned, 1786; married Catherine, daughter of Andrew Grant and grand-daughter of Lord Elchies, senator of the College of Justice, and had issue one daughter; died 3 October 1833;
(7) Andrew Anderson (1759-85), born 16 March 1759; died unmarried in 1785;
(8) Robert Anderson (1762-1831), born 28 February 1762; married 1st, 19 June 1794, Eleonora, daughter of Cornelius Elliot of Wolflee, and 2nd, 15 February 1810, Janet Harriet, daughter of David Stewart, provost of Edinburgh, but died without issue, 1831.
He lived at Stoneyhill. In 1786 he purchased the Inchyra estate, probably always intended as a home for third son.
He died 11 January 1786.

David Anderson,
by Sir Henry Raeburn
Anderson, David (1750-1825) of St. Germains.  Second son of David Anderson (1707-86) and his wife Mary, daughter of John Mitchelson of Middleton (Midl.), born 10 February 1750. Educated at Edinburgh High School. He went to India as a cadet in the East India Co.'s service in 1767 and became a revenue expert in the Bengal administration; as Ambassador to Mahadji Sindhia he negotiated the treaty of Salbai which ended the first Anglo-Maratha war, 1782; he retired 1785 and returned to England on the same ship as Warren Hastings, remaining his devoted friend until Hastings' death. As a result of private financial trading in India he returned a wealthy man, and in 1785 he estimate his fortune at £50,000. In 1785 he received the Freedom of the City of Edinburgh for his services in India. As DL for East Lothian he played a part in the suppression of an anti-militia revolt in Tranent in 1797. He married, 14 August 1788, Christian (d. 1824), daughter of Robert Findlay of Drummore and niece of Gen. Sir George Don, kt., Governor of Gibraltar, and had issue:
(1) David Anderson (1791-1869) (q.v.);
(2) Warren Hastings Anderson (1796-1875) of Beldornie Tower, Ryde (Isle of Wight), born 27 October 1796; married Mary, daughter of James Dewar of Vogrie and had issue four sons and three daughters; died 6 October 1875;
(3) Robert Anderson (b. & d. 1799), born 9 October and died in infancy, 12 November 1799;
(4) A daughter;
(5) A daughter;
(X1) Mary Anderson, baptised at Monghyr (India), 8 April 1775.
While still in India, he purchased the St. Germains estate in 1782 and on his return in 1785 he remodelled the house there.
He died 2/3 August 1825. His wife died in 1824.

Anderson, David (1791-1869) of St. Germains.  Eldest son of David Anderson (1750-1828) and his wife Christian, daughter of Robert Findlay of Drummore, born 10 June 1791. Educated at Edinburgh and Christ Church, Oxford (matriculated 1809); member of the Faculty of Advocates in Scotland, 1834; DL for East Lothian; a member of the Royal Company of Archers.  He married, 15 April 1828, Charlotte (d. 1868), daughter of Sir James Naesmyth of Posso, 3rd bt., and had issue:
(1) Eleonora Anne Anderson (1829-61), born 6 May 1829; married, 12 May 1858, Rev. Sir William Henry Gibson-Carmichael (1827-91), 10th bt. and had issue three sons and three daughters; died 6 January 1861;
(2) Charlotte Christina Anderson (1831-1916), born 3 February 1831; married, 18 November 1863, her cousin, Lt-Gen. David Anderson, son of Warren Hastings Anderson of Beldornie Tower, Ryde (Isle of Wight) and had issue two sons and three daughters;
(3) Mary Elizabeth Anderson (1832-36), born 23 February 1832; died young, 6 January 1836;
(4) David Murray Anderson (1834-60), born 27 February 1834; Lieutenant in Royal Navy; served in Black Sea area and was awarded Crimean Medal and Turkish Medal; died 16 September 1860;
(5) James Warren Hastings Anderson (1836-96) (q.v.);
(6) Julia Mary Anderson (1838-1922), born 21 May 1838; married, 1861, George Ballard (d. 1892) of the Indian Civil Service and had issue; died 7 July 1922;
(7) Anna Harriet Anderson (1841-91), born 13 November 1841; died unmarried, 17 June 1891.
He inherited the St. Germains estate from his father in 1825.
He died 14 April 1869. His wife died 31 January 1868.

Anderson, Lt-Col. James Warren Hastings (1836-96) of Bowerhouse. Second but only surviving son of David Anderson (1791-1869) and his wife Charlotte, daughter of Sir James Naesmyth of Posso, 3rd bt., born 18 July 1836. Educated at Royal Military College, Sandhurst; served with 69th Regiment and 87th Royal Irish Fusiliers; commanded Haddingtonshire Volunteers; DL for East Lothian.  He married, 14 March 1867, Christina (d. 1902), daughter of Thomas Sharp Mitchell-Innes of Phantassie (East Lothian) and had issue:
(1) David Murray Anderson (1867-1944) (q.v.);
(2) Charlotte Elinor Anderson (1870-1959), born 30 June 1870; died unmarried, 11 February 1959;
(3) Katharine Julia Anderson (1872-1958), born 17 April 1872; married, 14 February 1901, Alexander Harold Mitchell-Innes of Whitehall (Berwicks.) and had issue; died 9 August 1958;
(3) Robert Warren Hastings Anderson (1875-1969) (q.v.).
He inherited the St. Germains estate from his father in 1869 but sold it in 1874 and bought the Bowerhouse estate instead.
He died 10 July 1896. His widow died 8 February 1902.

Anderson, David Murray (1867-1944) of Bowerhouse. Elder son of Lt-Col. James Warren Hastings Anderson (1836-96) and his wife Christina, daughter of Thomas Sharp Mitchell-Innes, born 28 October 1867. Educated at Wellington and Royal Military College, Sandhurst; served as Capt. in 8th Royal Irish Hussars; member of the Royal Company of Archers; JP and DL for East Lothian.  He married, 12 February 1908, Alice Helen Mary JP (d. 1938), daughter of Rev. Edward Cheese, rector of Haughton-le-Skerne, but had no issue.
He inherited the Bowerhouse estate from his father in 1896 but sold it in 1939.
He died 29 April 1944. His wife died 3 November 1938.

Anderson, Maj. Robert Warren Hastings (1875-1969) of Northfield House. Younger son of Lt-Col. James Warren Hastings Anderson (1836-96) and his wife Christina, daughter of Thomas Sharp Mitchell-Innes, born 19 May 1875.  Educated at Wellington and Royal Military College, Sandhurst; served in Highland Light Infantry, 1894-1910 (Major) and was involved in occupation of Crete, 1898 and Boer War, 1899-1902 (mentioned in despatches); JP for Fife, 1913.  He married, 19 April 1906, Everilda Lucy (d. 1963), daughter of Col. Sir Thomas Horatio Marshall of Hartford Beach (Cheshire), and had issue:
(1) Donald Marshall Anderson (1911-2001) (q.v.).
He purchased Northfield House, Colinsburgh in 1911.
He died 29 August 1969. His wife died 21 October 1963.

Anderson, Lt-Col. Donald Marshall (1911-2001) of Northfield House.  Only child of Maj. Robert Warren Hastings Anderson (1875-1969) and his wife Everilda Lucy, daughter of Col. Sir Thomas Horatio Marshall of Hartford Beach (Cheshire), born 6 June 1911. Educated at Wellington and Royal Military College, Sandhurst. Served in Highland Light Infantry, 1931-58 and saw service in Italy, Palestine and Ghana.  He married, 18 February 1938, Elizabeth Georgiana (1912-99), daughter of Col. Hugh Stainton Poyntz of Winchester (Hants), and had issue:
(1) John Murray Anderson (b. 1939) of Wetheral (Cumbria), born 6 August 1939; educated at Strathallan School; married 1st, 10 May 1961 (div. 1978), Sheila Margaret, daughter of Howard Benjamin Smith of Bloxwich (Staffs) and had issue two sons and one daughter, and 2nd, 24 September 1984 (div.), Margaret Ann Harper, daughter of Richard Ernest Waterhouse; and 3rd [name unknown];
(2) Margaret Elizabeth Anderson (b. 1941) of Northfield House, born 8 January 1941; educated at Seymour Lodge, Crieff; married, 31 August 1961 (div. 1986), James Vernon Aynscough, son of James Geoffrey Aynscough of North Heads, Casterton (Westmorland) and had issue two sons and two daughters.
He inherited Northfield House from his father in 1969.
He died 8 November 2001.


John Anderson, by
Sir Henry Raeburn
Anderson, John (1754-1814) of Inchyra House.  Third son of David Anderson (1707-86) and his wife Mary, daughter of John Mitchelson of Middleton (Midl.), born 4/14 August 1754. Apprenticed to Samuel Mitchelson WS; writer to the signet, 1779; Commissioner of Supply for Perthshire. He married, 9 August 1784 at Blandfield, Edinburgh, his cousin, Janet (1765-1851), daughter of Samuel Mitchelson, WS, and had issue:
(1) Jane Anderson (c.1788-1866); married, 18 December 1815, Alexander Wood (1788-1864), Lord Wood and had issue three sons and two daughters; died 1866;
(2) David Anderson (later Blair) (c.1791-1853) (q.v.);
(3) Samuel Anderson (1791-1849); apprenticed to his father; writer to the signet, 1818 but later wine merchant; married 1st, 30 April 1824, Anne, daughter of James Milnes of Heatherwick House (East Lothian) and 2nd, 15 May 1833, Charlotte Wilkinson; died 11 July 1849;
(4) John Anderson (1799-1862), born 15 June 1799; apprenticed to Thomas Cranston WS; writer to the signet, 1824; married, 15 October 1833, Harriet, daughter of George Carr of Newcastle; died 4 May 1862;
(5) Francis Anderson (1804-55), born 19 August 1804; apprenticed to Thomas Cranston WS; writer to the signet, 1837; married, 24 October 1848 at St John's Chapel, Edinburgh, Henrietta Maria, daughter of Rev. Dr. Edward Law, British chaplain at St Petersburg; died 18 December 1855;
(6) James Anderson (b. 1806; fl. 1851); writer to the signet?; married Helen M. [surname unknown]; lived at 34 Charlotte Square, Edinburgh;
(7) Findlay Anderson (1807-84), born 4 February 1807; served with Indian Civil Service and retired to Inchyra Grange; JP for Perthshire; married 1st, 10 December 1840 at Weston-super-Mare (Somerset), Mary Charlotte, daughter of Lt-Col. C.M. Edwards of 1st Ceylon Regt., and 2nd, c.1845, Selina Harriet Walker (1824-1916) and had issue; died 15 November 1884;
(8) Mary Anderson; married, 15 September 1827, Col. Robert Pitman.
He inherited the Inchyra estate from his father in 1786 and built the present house there. His widow lived at 34 Charlotte Square, Edinburgh.
He died 18 June 1814 and was buried at Kinnoull (Perths.).  His widow died 18 May 1851.

Anderson (later Blair), David (c.1791-1853) of Inchyra House. Eldest son of John Anderson (1754-1814) and his wife Jane, daughter of Samuel Mitchelson, born about 1791. A member of the Scottish Faculty of Advocates; Commissioner of Supply for Perthshire. He took the additional name of Blair in 1814 in accordance with the terms by which his father had purchased the Inchyra estate in 1785. He appears from his will to have spent part of his working life as an advocate in Ceylon. He married, 4 October 1849 at St. Marylebone (Middx), Helena Hester (1804-71), daughter of Sir William Rough, kt., Acting Chief Justice of Ceylon, but died without issue.
He inherited Inchyra House from his father in 1814 but sold it (perhaps c.1836), and lived subsequently at The Firs, Holybourne, Hampshire.
He died 24 August 1853 and his will was proved 11 October 1853. His widow was buried 15 April 1871 at St Bartholomew, Hyde, Winchester (Hants).

Sources

Burke's Landed Gentry, 1972, pp. 22-23; Burke's Landed Gentry of the Kingdom of Scotland, 2001, pp. 17-18; C. McWilliam, The buildings of Scotland: Lothian, 1978, pp. 122-23, 421; J. Gifford, The buildings of Scotland: Perth & Kinross, 2007, pp. 422-23; S. Baker, The country houses, castles and mansions of East Lothian, 2009, p. 67.


Location of archives


Anderson, David (1750-1825): correspondence and papers, 1767-1822 [British Library, Add. MSS 45417–45441]; official correspondence, 1782-95 [British Library, Oriental & India Office collections, Home Misc. series]; correspondence with Warren Hastings [British Library, Add. MSS. 29117-94]


Coat of arms


Argent, a saltire engrailed sable between a crescent in chief and three mullets pierced of the field, two in fesse and one in base, gules.